Kanchani Milk

Golden Goddess Milk

Turmeric is a root, like ginger, but with a bright and glorious, rich golden hue. It’s hard to find in stores in its most natural root form, but you’ll find it easily in the spice aisle of any market. Turmeric is an old (4,000 year old) Ayurvedic and Tradition Chinese Medicine remedy for many ailments. In Sanskrit, turmeric’s name is “Kanchani” which means Golden Goddess. Turmeric truly is a goddess of healing. It is anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory. And, if all that wasn’t enough to get turmeric in your diet right NOW, there’s research on turmeric’s ability to fight cancer. HERE’s a link to a brief, but full-of-information article on circumin, the main healing ingredient in turmeric. If you are using turmeric for an acute health condition, I recommend sourcing ALL organic ingredients to lessen your toxic load while trying to heal.

You may wonder why there’s black pepper added to the recipe. The black pepper works as a catalyst with the turmeric to make the healing properties available to the body. Just a little pepper is enough to release the circumin.

Kanchani Milk

Makes 2 – 8oz. servings

Ingredients:

  • 16 oz. raw whole milk (or almond milk)
  • 4T raw local honey or to taste
  • 1T coconut butter or coconut cream, melted and warm, not hot
  • 1t dried turmeric
  • 1t chia seeds
  • 1t real vanilla extract
  • 1t local bee pollen
  • ¼t dried ginger
  • ¼t cardamom
  • ⅛t freshly fine-ground black pepper
  • a couple shakes of cinnamon

Directions: Put all ingredients in a large mason jar, cover, and shake until all ingredients combine. If you find that some of the dried spices are clumping you can use a blender or a stick blender to incorporate the ingredients. Let the milk sit for an hour or so for the chia seeds to expand before drinking.

Drink as is, refrigerated, or slightly warmed.

 

 

Wildflower Honey Liqueur

HoneyLiqueurBottle

This honey liqueur is simply delicious. It is an adaptation I made from Jane Lawson’s Snowflakes and Schnapps cookbook. It’s a beautifully done cookbook, rich with food photos and simple, wholesome (and gourmet) recipes. I highly recommend getting yourself a copy, not just for the visual feast, but the way she takes you on a culinary tour of Europe with her recipes.

There’s something about this liqueur that says sweet comfort. It’s full of flavor, and if you’re sipping it neat you can really taste the subtle flavors. Before you make this decide on what kind of honey to use. If you want a more robust, earthy flavor (my favorite) use the darker fall harvest honey. If you would prefer a lighter, more delicate flavor that will highlight the infusion, choose the lighter, spring harvest honey.

HoneyLiqueurInPan

Honey and Saffron Liqueur, adapted from Jane Lawson

Makes 1 Litre

Ingredients:

  • 750ml bottle of good vodka
  • ½C water
  • 1C dark, fall honey
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • ½ of a vanilla bean, split lengthwise, and finely chopped
  • 10 white peppercorns
  • ¼t freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 pinches of saffron threads
  • 3 strips of lemon zest, white pith removed

Directions:

Put the honey, water, cinnamon stick, chopped vanilla bean, peppercorns, nutmeg, and saffron in a saucepan and bring just to boil. Quickly reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat, add the lemon zest and set aside to infuse for 20 minutes.

Reheat until simmering, then remove from the heat and cool completely. Once cooled, strain through a fine mesh sieve, and add the vodka. Carefully pour into a sterilized airtight bottle and allow to the flavors to infuse at room temperature for a week before drinking.

Serving Suggestions:

  1. Neat (my favorite way) or On The Rocks.
  2. Martini: 2 parts vodka or gin, 1 part honey liqueur. Add a lemon twist.
  3. Whiskey/Scotch/Bourbon: equal parts honey liqueur and spirits, iced or neat.